Federico Fernández
Federico Fernández
Name
Federico Fernández
E-Mail
Country
Austria
Motto
Federico N. Fernández is President of Fundación Internacional Bases (Rosario, Argentina) and a Senior Fellow with the Austrian Economics Center (Vienna, Austria). He is also the president of the Organizing Committee of the International Conference “The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century,” which has taken place every two years since 2006 in Rosario (Argentina). He has been actively engaged in work within the Liberty movement for more than a decade.

He is author of scholarly articles, he is member of the Editorial Board of the academic journal “Libertas Segunda Época,” editor of the book “De Viena a Rosario. Ensayos para una sociedad abierta”, and he is the co-editor of the books “La escuela austríaca de economía en el siglo XXI” and “An Austrian in Argentina: Essays in honor of Alberto Benegas Lynch (Jr).”

Fernández writes for the popular press and also blogs on the “Free Market Diaries” and “La Opinión Incómoda.”
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Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part III)

Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part III)

Walter Block "Almost 70% of American voters under the age of 30 voted for Obama.  Why isn't anyone calling for the deportation of America's youth, or limits on fertility to raise our average age?" Bryan Caplan (2009) Walter Block’s case for free immigration (1998, 2011a, 2011b) can be divided in, at least, two sections. One consists in his own position about…

Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part II)

Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part II)

Ben Powell “Immigrants tend to have especially desirable behavioral characteristics from the economic point of view. Compared to natives, their rate of participation in the labor force is higher, they tend to save more, they apply more effort during working hours, and they have a higher propensity to start new businesses and to be self-employed. They do not have a higher propensity to…

Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part I)

Open Borders? Maybe Not. Immigration According to the Austrian School (Part I)

Immigration is a pressing issue nowadays, especially in Europe and the United States. Some of the most interesting scholarly literature about it comes from the field of economics. Within economics one can find the Austrian School of Economics or Austrian tradition.  Austrian economics are usually –and with good reason– related with the tenets of Classical Liberalism and even…

Competition Encourages You To Become The Best Version Of Yourself

Competition Encourages You To Become The Best Version Of Yourself

by Federico N. Fernández  Competition isn’t our enemy. It’s not a destabilizing force within society. On the contrary, competition helps each and every one of us to achieve our best. Although this may sound strange, competing against somebody is also cooperating with them.  How so?  Well, being in competition with someone forces you to give your best. …

There’s No Such Thing As Settled Science

There’s No Such Thing As Settled Science

by Federico N. Fernández In the book Darwin’s legacy, philosopher John Dupré makes an interesting remark: “I… do maintain that science can accumulate enough evidence for its claims to make them almost [1] impossible to reject, and I believe that certain broad evolutionary theses have earned this level of credibility.” Due to the ‘almost’,…

Be Wary of Authorities… On Climate and Otherwise

Be Wary of Authorities… On Climate and Otherwise

by Federico N. Fernández The recent events in Houston with the Hurricane Harvey have brought -once again- the issue of climate change to our attention.  Political figures such as Jean Claude Juncker, Al Gore, and Barack Obama, just to name a few, often referred to a survey that asserts that 97% of world’s scientists believe in man-made climate change. This assertion is…

Open Discussion Is the Cornerstone of a Healthy Democracy

Open Discussion Is the Cornerstone of a Healthy Democracy

One of Karl Popper’s most influential book is ‘The open society and its enemies.’ Published in 1945, he even considered it his own contribution to the effort of World War II. Popper believed that in Ancient Greece we could find the first traces of Western open societies. Their main feature is that nomos (legal order) is no longer part of the physis (natural order). Thus, in an…

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